Gallery

1.Family involvement in the early childhood settings benefits all children (Weiss et al., 2006) and multiplies children’s opportunities for learning. Parents and other caregivers who are involved in the early childhood settings tend to be more supportive of children’s learning and their children tend to have a positive outcome in primary grades (Cleveland et al., 2006; Sylva et al., 2004).
Family involvement in the early childhood settings benefits all children (Weiss et al., 2006) and multiplies children’s opportunities for learning. Parents and other caregivers who are involved in the early childhood settings tend to be more supportive of children’s learning and their children tend to have a positive outcome in primary grades (Cleveland et al., 2006; Sylva et al., 2004).

 

6.Teachers of young children recognize the importance of children’s social development. The development of social skills lays out a critical foundation for later academic achievement as well as work-related skills (McClelland & Morrison, 2003). The children pictured above are sharing a soapy bowl. They are intrigued and engaged and spend several minutes trying to figure out what is in the bowl.
Teachers of young children recognize the importance of children’s social development. The development of social skills lays out a critical foundation for later academic achievement as well as work-related skills (McClelland & Morrison, 2003).
The children pictured above are sharing a soapy bowl. They are intrigued and engaged and spend several minutes trying to figure out what is in the bowl.

 

 

 

 

 

SOAP PLAY!
Sensory experiences help children develop in the areas of understanding of the world -communication and language, Expressive Arts and Design and Personal, Social and Emotional Development. The children pictured above are exploring green bubbly water. They fill and pour cups and scoops and they are sharing space and communicating with each other.

 

 

 

NATURE!
Through positive experiences with nature, we set the stage for a lifetime commitment to caring for the earth, animals, and our communities. Early childhood is indeed the time to plant seeds of wonder. Children at our centre have the opportunity to explore all that High Park has to offer. The children pictured above are exploring and extending their play. They improvise and pretend the tree stump is a drum.

 

 

 

 

YOGA WITH RENA!
Movement is one of the most important skills of a young child’s life. Most early interactions involve movement. Many of us have a distinct predisposition to think better and more freely while involved in a repetitive, low concentration physical task. Children pictured are learning and practicing yoga with our staff member Ms Rena. The children are engaged and provided with opportunities to build on their gross motor skills.
The children pretend they are camping and call Ms. Mary to join in on the fun. This builds Symbolic Thought, Representation and Root Skills of Literacy.
The children enjoy Splashing in the water on hot days during the summer months.
All aboard! The children sustain and extend their socio-dramatic play with language, ideas and props.
Cause-and-effect exploration as the children respond with joy to the predictable outcome of the parachute.
Who Wants coffee? Children build Symbolic thought, Representation and root skills of literacy when they pretend play.
Who needs paper when you have a fence? The children enjoy painting the playgrounds fence, building their palmar and pincer grasp skills.
Walking through High Park, The preschoolers pretend they are on a bear hunt.
The children observe how our garden is growing, they notice the seeds have sprouted stems and leafs.
The children visually attend to their natural environment as they observe worms in the dirt.
J, explores the tunnel as he crawls through it. This helps build visual pattern perception.